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English


What Are Antonyms?

Learn what antonyms are with the help of our friends, the hippo and the mouse. These fun characters will explain that antonyms are words with opposite meaning, and will be playing a game to practice what they've learned together.

What Are Synonyms?

Learn what antonyms are with the help of our friends, the hippo and the mouse. These fun characters will explain that synonyms are words that have the same or similar meaning, and will be playing a game to practice what they've learned together.

Vowels and Consonants

Bingo's Lingo

In this video students will learn to recognise vowels and the sounds they make.
Compound Sentences: Showing Relationships Between Instructions

Compound Sentences: Showing Relationships Between Instructions

Grammar for Writing

To write a recipe that’s easy to understand and follow, it’s important to show the relationships between a series of individual instructions or directions. This video covers how to combine simple commands into compound sentences, using the...Show More
Statements: Presenting Facts and Findings

Statements: Presenting Facts and Findings

Grammar for Writing

When writing a biography, article, report or instruction manual, delivering information in a clear and engaging way is crucial. This video introduces the two most common sentence types found in informative texts—statements and commands—and...Show More
Statements and Commands: Giving Instructions

Statements and Commands: Giving Instructions

Grammar for Writing

A good instructional text needs to get your message across clearly and be easy for readers to follow. This video explains the difference between two sentence types commonly found in informative texts—statements and commands—and how to use...Show More
Simple Sentences: Giving Opinions and Persuading

Simple Sentences: Giving Opinions and Persuading

Grammar for Writing

For letters to the editor, online discussions and essays, being able to express your point of view effectively is very useful. This video highlights that you don't have to use complicated sentences to write a good persuasive text—clear and...Show More
Simple Sentences: Creating Drama and Tension

Simple Sentences: Creating Drama and Tension

Grammar for Writing

A well-written narrative, such as a short story, poem or script, can be exciting, tense and suspenseful. This video illustrates how short, simple sentences can be used to create a different pace and mood in narrative writing, compared to longer...Show More
Simple Sentences: Stating Opinions and Persuading

Simple Sentences: Stating Opinions and Persuading

Grammar for Writing

When writing a movie review, it is important to be able to express your opinions and conclusions precisely. This video reinforces that sometimes, it can be more effective to use simple sentences, rather than compound or complex sentences, for...Show More
Compound Sentences: Showing Relationships Between Events

Compound Sentences: Showing Relationships Between Events

Grammar for Writing

When writing a recount, such as a diary entry, you might find yourself needing to show the relationships or connections between ideas. This video explains how to use compound sentences to describe a series of events, using the coordinating...Show More
Simple Sentences: Stating Opinions and Conclusions

Simple Sentences: Stating Opinions and Conclusions

Grammar for Writing

There's a skill to writing great science reports that are both clear and easy to understand. This video identifies the sections of a report where it can be better to use simple sentences, rather than more detailed ones, to make it easy for...Show More
Questions: Revealing Characters' Feelings

Questions: Revealing Characters' Feelings

Grammar for Writing

Being able to give your reader an insight into your character's mind is a valuable skill in writing narratives. This video explains how questions can be used to reveal what characters are thinking, whether genuine or rhetorical, and from a...Show More
Statements, Questions and Commands: Developing Characters

Statements, Questions and Commands: Developing Characters

Grammar for Writing

Characters are an essential component of many narrative texts, such as a novel or a short story. This video shows how you can use a variety of sentence types—statements, questions, and commands—in your narrative writing to develop characters...Show More
Imagination

Imagination

Curriculum Karaoke

Students read, sing and learn about the benefits of using one’s imagination, as well as its accessibility, power, and endless possibilities for creativity. This curriculum-aligned song targets outcomes of curriculum documents and supports and...Show More

Letter Blends: Part 2

Bingo's Lingo

Letter Blends is a truly engaging way to teach and reinforce phonics rules that require a ton of repetition and practice to master. Using these videos to teach letter blends (or consonant blends) gives kids the chance to get comfortable with...Show More

Letter Blends: Part 1

Bingo's Lingo

Letter Blends is a truly engaging way to teach and reinforce phonics rules that require a ton of repetition and practice to master. Using these videos to teach letter blends (or consonant blends) gives kids the chance to get comfortable with...Show More

Bingo's Phonics

Bingo's Lingo

This video was designed to help children learn the alphabetic principle — the idea that letters represent the sounds of spoken language — and that there is an organised, logical, and predictable relationship between written letters and spoken...Show More

Letter Blends: Part 3

Bingo's Lingo

Letter Blends is a truly engaging way to teach and reinforce phonics rules that require a ton of repetition and practice to master. Using these videos to teach letter blends (or consonant blends) gives kids the chance to get comfortable with...Show More
Keep It Up

Keep It Up

Out of This Word

Max holds a book above his head. Moon asks why he is studying this way. Max says it’s because she told him to “keep it up.” Max took it literally, when Moon only meant to encourage him to keep studying.
Nick of Time

Nick of Time

Out of This Word

Max loses a race because another competitor passes the finish line in the “nick of time.” Max thinks Moon is referring to Nick, the race winner. What she really meant was Nick won just in time, at the last possible moment.
Smell a Rat

Smell a Rat

Out of This Word

Max receives a message on his computer. The message says the computer is infected and Max must download special software. Moon stops him, telling Max she “smells a rat.”
Fired

Fired

Out of This Word

Max and Moon read an article about someone getting fired for cheating. Max imagines this person literally set on fire. Moon tells him being “fired” means to be dismissed from a job.
Win Hands Down

Win Hands Down

Out of This Word

Max and Moon play chess. Max puts Moon’s king in checkmate. Moon is surprised at first but accepts defeat. She tells Max he “won hands down.”
Boycott

Boycott

Out of This Word

Max reads a news article. The headline says “Boycott a success.” Max and Moon discuss the word “boycott” and the historical person for whom it’s named.
Break a Leg

Break a Leg

Out of This Word

Max is nervous as he prepares to take the stage in a school play. Backstage, Moon wishes Max good luck by telling him to “break a leg.” Max freaks out because he imagines Moon wants him to literally break his leg.